Events

Events

Upcoming events Spring  2014- check back regularly for updates!

January 21: Neuroethics Journal Club: How early can signs of autism be detected in infants?
Time: 11:45am
Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102

This journal club will be facilitated by ILA graduate student and Neuroethics Scholar Jen Sarrett.

January 23: Master of Arts in Bioethics Open House

Time: 5pm - 7pm

Location: Emory Center for Ethics 1531 Dickey Drive

January 30: Ethics @ the Movies - DEAR DAD
Time: 7pm
Location: Emory Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Dear Dad,” is a film that peeks into the lives of your friends, brothers, cousins, co-workers, sons, and uncles. You'll meet 8 diverse same gender loving men. The project aims to give same gender loving men a platform to tell their varying yet universal stories about their relationship with their father and how it has shaped them as men.

“This project was meant to help these men and men like them appreciate what gave them hope and heal what gave them hurt.” - Chase Simmons

February 3: Ethics on the Stage: Love and Warcraft (Partnership with Alliance Theatre)

Time: 7pm

Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102

Synopsis: Love and Warcraft - Dramatic reading of select scenes and an engaging ethical discussion.
Evie is a master of relationships. Other
people’s relationships. That’s why she has a waiting list of classmate clients
willing to pay her top dollar to get their GFs and BFs back. How? She uses
strategy, finds people’s weaknesses, and then attacks with words weaponized
with just the right amount of guilt, longing, and/or lust – whatever a
relationship may need. You know, all the skills and tactics she picked up on
the way to becoming one of the best World of Warcraft players in the world

February 5: Artist Talk - Jessica Caldas

Time: 6:30pm

Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102

Synopsis: "My interest in the changing dynamics of relationships has aligned with my day job at the Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation working with survivors of intimate partner violence. Relationships in domestic violence cases are rich, complex juxtapositions of hope and pain against backgrounds that beg the question “what is normal?” I am focused on the shift objects take on in the context of violent relationships and what this means for victims. Objects which were once mundane change into weapons and tools of oppression, and spaces that were once safe become places of violence and fear."


February 17: Public Health, Religion and Ethics Lecture Series with Allan Kellehear

Lecture: Public Health Approaches to End of Life Care: Implications for Spiritual Care

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: Emory School of Medicine

Synopsis: This lecture will begin with the globally widespread clinical, acute-care culture of palliative care before introducing an outline of public health/health promotion approaches to palliative care. A public health approach to palliative care is one that recognizes that many of the social, psychological and spiritual troubles that people living with dying, bereavement, and long term care are amenable to public health concepts of prevention, harm reduction, and early intervention. These interventions embrace community development, health promotion, death education, and ecological strategies. The future of palliative care must embrace this approach if it is to successfully achieve greater access for all and provide a meaningful continuity of care at the end of life.  This approach brings internal and external challenges for chaplaincy and pastoral care, integral parts of palliative care.

February 18:  Workshop: Public Health Approaches to End of Life Care: Creating Compassionate Communities

Time: 9:00am

Location: Emory Center for Ethics 162

Synopsis: Registration required: RSVP to phreseries@emory.edu

This workshop will have two parts: (1) an introductory lecture introducing and describing this approach. This will be followed by (2) group work about how to integrate and apply these ideas in practice. Public health approaches to end of life care are derived from the ‘new’ public health ideas developed in the 1970s and 80s. These approaches emphasize traditional ideas such as prevention, harm-reduction and early intervention but do so with more recent ideas about community development, health promotion, health and death education, ecological strategies, and participatory relations. The concepts and methodologies that we employ to promote health and wellbeing in our national health policies are also applicable to the experiences of dying, bereavement and long term care because each of these life experiences bring with them their own profile of morbidities and mortalities. Living with life-limiting illness, bereavement, or long term care attracts physical, psychological, social, and spiritual troubles that are amenable to the public health strategies of prevention, harm reduction and early intervention. Creating communities that understand that it is not only health that is everyone’s responsibility but also dying, loss and care, is fundamental to all public health approaches to end of life care

February 18: Neuroethics Journal Club

Time: 11:45am

Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102

Synopsis:

March 18: Neuroethics Journal Club

Time: 11:45am

Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102

Synopsis:

March 20 - 21: Healthcare Ethics Consortium Annual Conference

Location: Emory Conference Center

Synopsis: Embracing Change: Balancing Innovation and Our Humanity

April 8: Southwest Airlines Art and Social Engagement Project Unveiling
Location: Cox Hall
Time: 6:00pm

April 15: Neuroethics Journal Club
Location: Emory Center for Ethics Commons 102
Time: 11:45am

April 16: Free Speech Arts Cafe'
Location: Emory Center for Ethics Commons 102
Time: 

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August 20: Art Exhibit - Charmaine Minniefield: New Freedom and Other images
Time: August - October
Location: Emory Center for Ethics
Synopsis:Charmaine Minniefield is an Atlanta-based artist and arts administrator. Her work explores African and African American ritual from a feminist perspective. Her images draw from “ancestral memory” or indigenous traditions as seen throughout the Diaspora. New Freedom is a recent series of works on canvas, fabric and paper which celebrate female strength and leadership from post-emancipation to after the turn of the century.

 
August 21:Ethics on the Stage Event- Harmony (ethical discussion and dramatic readings) Partnership with Alliance Theatre
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Rita Anne Rollins Building Room 252 - 1531 Dickey Drive Atlanta, GA 30322
Synopsis: Six talented young men came together in 1930s Germany taking the world by storm with their blend of sophisticated close harmonies and uproarious stage antics.

August 25: Emory University New Student Orientation

September 10th: Public Health, Religion and Ethics Fall 2013 Series - BBC's "Call the Midwife" - Topic: Disability
Time-  7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location- Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Join us for three screenings of Call the Midwife, the award-winning BBC dramatic series.  Based on a memoir about the impoverished East End of London in the 1950s, the series follows a group of young nurse-midwives in the newly-created British National Health Service who live and work with an order of Anglican sisters also nurse-midwives, who have served their community for many years. In their work of providing high-quality public health care to London's poorest they encounter many ethical issues, responding to them from their distinctly different perspectives.

September 17: Ethics @ the Movies - The Sessions - (partnership with Disability Studies)
Time: 7:00pm
Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Based on the poignantly optimistic autobiographical writings of California-based journalist and poet Mark O'Brien, THE SESSIONS tells the story of a man confined to an iron lung who is determined - at age 38 - to lose his virgiity. With the help of his therapists and the guidance of his priest, he sets out to make his dream a reality. (Trailer)

September 18: Artist Talk with Charmaine Minniefield
Time: 6:30pm
Location:Center for Ethics Commons 102

October 2: HCECG Workshop - New Models for Ethics Committees: Preventing Intractable Cases
Time: 9:00am - 4:000pm
Location: Emory Center for Ethics

October 9: Ethics on the Stage: By the way, Meet Vera Stark (Partnership with Alliance Theatre)
Time: 7:00pm
Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Even in the 1930s…wait, especially in the 1930s, Hollywood was full of glamour, humor, and personality. And yes, there was also all of the insecurity, cutthroat competition, and scarce opportunities, particularly for women of color. This is where we meet the beautiful Vera Stark, one of those women of color.

Written by Pulitzer Prize winner Lynn Nottage (Intimate Apparel) and inspired by the life and career of Theresa Harris, a pioneering African-American film star.

October 15 – Neuroethics Journal Club: Sexual Fantasies and Gender/Sex
Location: Center or Ethics 102
Synopsis: This journal club will be facilitated by Neuroscience graduate student, Mallory Bowers. Mallory is co-organizer of the upcoming Neuroethics Student Symposium, Bias in the Academy: From Neural Networks to Social Networks . We will discuss the attached article, "Sexual Fantasies and Gender/Sex: A multi method approach with quantitative content analysis and hormonal responses”
Lunch is provided and seating is limited. To secure your seat and your lunch, please RSVP by Friday, Oct 11, 2013 to akear@emory.edu

October 16: Public Health, Religion and Ethics Fall 2013 Series - BBC's "Call the Midwife" - Topic: Disability
Time-  7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location- Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Join us for three screenings of Call the Midwife, the award-winning BBC dramatic series.  Based on a memoir about the impoverished East End of London in the 1950s, the series follows a group of young nurse-midwives in the newly-created British National Health Service who live and work with an order of Anglican sisters also nurse-midwives, who have served their community for many years. In their work of providing high-quality public health care to London's poorest they encounter many ethical issues, responding to them from their distinctly different perspectives.

October 17: Clinical Ethics Seminar: The Spectrum of “Shared Decision-Making” and the Use of Collaborative Paternalism as a Decision-Making Model
with Dr. William Sexon, Neonatologist
Time:5:00pm
Location: Center for Ethics Seminar Room 162
Objectives:

• Define the various methods of decision making within the spectrum of “Shared Decision Making”
• List the essential components of “consent”
• Identify the essential, but distinctly separate, roles of the family and the physician in the decision making process
• Understand the use of each of the various decision making approaches, including “collaborative paternalism” in helping the family make decisions

October 22: Ethics @ the Movies - Rust and Bone - (partnership with Disability Studies)
Time: 7:00pm
Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Put in charge of his young son, Alain leaves Belgium for Antibes to live with his sister and her husband as a family. Alain's bond with Stephanie, a killer whale trainer, grows deeper after Stephanie suffers a horrible accident. (Trailer)

October 23: Raymond F. Schinazi Lecture in Religion and Bioethics with Daniel Sulmasy, MD, PhD
Time: 4:00pm
Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Dr. Daniel Sulmasy, MD, PhD, who is the Kilbride-Clinton Professor of Medicine and Ethics in the Department of Medicine and Divinity School at the University of Chicago as well as the Associate Director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics in the Department of Medicine. A scholar of international repute, he will be discussing spirituality and healthcare by reflecting on a particular case/experience with a patient.

October 24 - 27:  The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities Annual Conference (ASBH)
Location: Atlanta, Georgia

November 1: Zombethics Conference
Time: 10:00am - 4:00pm
Location: Cemter for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Join us for our second annual symposium that will bring together scholars from a variety of disciplines – including disability studies, film and media, English, bioethics, religion, and neuroethics – to  discuss a theme to which we can all relate: zombies.

November 12: Master of Arts in Bioethics Open House
Time: 5:00pm
Location: Emory Center for Ethics

November 12th: Public Health, Religion and Ethics Fall 2013 Series - BBC's "Call the Midwife" - Topic: Suicide
Time-  7:00pm to 8:30pm
Location- Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis: Join us for three screenings of Call the Midwife, the award-winning BBC dramatic series.  Based on a memoir about the impoverished East End of London in the 1950s, the series follows a group of young nurse-midwives in the newly-created British National Health Service who live and work with an order of Anglican sisters also nurse-midwives, who have served their community for many years. In their work of providing high-quality public health care to London's poorest they encounter many ethical issues, responding to them from their distinctly different perspectives.

November 15: HCECG Workshop - Putting Mediation and Conflict Management Skills to Work in Ethics Consultations
Time: 9:00am - 4:000pm
Location: Emory Center for Ethics

November 14: Art Exhibition: Jessica Caldas
Time: November - February
Location: Emory Center for Ethics
Synopsis:

November 19: Ethics & the Arts Cafe
Time:7:00 p.m.
Location:Center for Ethics Commons 102
Synopsis:Leveraging Your Musical Gifts to Provoke Social Change

November 20: Ethics @ the Movies in collaboration with Disability <IN FOCUS> - The Story of Luke
Time: 7pm
Location: Emory Center for Ethics
Synopsis: Sheltered by his grandparents, Luke, a young man with autism, is thrust into a world that doesn't expect anything from him. But Luke is on a quest for a job and true love. And he isn't taking no for an answer.
Trailer

December 4: Operationalizing the Research on Bias; Faculty Hiring and Recruitment Practices with Dona Yarbrough
Time: 4:00pm
Location: Grace Crum Rollins Building, Rita Anne Rollins Room 860

Synopsis: Have you encountered challenges related to stereotyping in your academic career? This year's Neuroethics Symposia, a partnership of Emory's Neuroscience Graduate Program, Laney Graduate School and the Emory Center for Ethics Neuroethics Program, is designed to discuss the complex influence of stereotype/bias on academia and apply advances in the science of stereotype bias to university policies and practices. Through a pre-symposia seminar series and symposia, a white paper will be produced to highlight challenges and to put forth practical solutions to move toward mitigating the detrimental influence of bias and stereotyping in academia.

December 10:2013 Neuroethics Symposium - Bias in the Academy
Location: Emory School of Medicine Rm 110

Synopsis: Have you encountered challenges related to stereotyping in your academic career? This year's Neuroethics Symposia, a partnership of Emory's Neuroscience Graduate Program, Laney Graduate School and the Emory Center for Ethics Neuroethics Program, is designed to discuss the complex influence of stereotype/bias on academia and apply advances in the science of stereotype bias to university policies and practices. Through a pre-symposia seminar series and symposia, a white paper will be produced to highlight challenges and to put forth practical solutions to move toward mitigating the detrimental influence of bias and stereotyping in academia.


December 17: Neuroethics Journal Club: Creating False Memories
Time: 11:45am
Location: Center for Ethics Commons 102

Synopsis: This journal club will be facilitated by Chemistry graduate student, Katie Strong. We will discuss "Creating a False Memory in the Brain"

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